Author Archives: Patti Ashley

Patti Ashley
Dr. Patti Ashley works with families children and individuals. She has taught special education with youths diagnosed with autism, emotional disorders and learning disabilities; developing parent education and support programs and taught college classes in child development, infancy and care-giving. Currently, Patti owns Breakthrough Psychotherapy & Parent Coaching in Niwot, Colorado where she specializes in parenting, relationships and individual growth. She is the author of the book Living in the Shadow of the Too-Good Mother Archetype

Six steps for thriving with your three-year-old

Six steps for thriving with your three-year-old

Everyone hears the phrase “the terrible twos.” The normal behaviors of a toddler between the ages of eighteen months and three years (give or take a few months,) include things such as saying “no, “ being defiant and having temper tantrums. At this age, a child is trying to find a separate self from mom and dad, and it can be challenging for both the child and the parent as the toddler starts to test his/her independence and autonomy. Parents having often heard the phrase “terrible twos,” wait for this time to end, thinking once my child is three they ...

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Parent worry, am I “messing up” my kids?

Parent worry, am I “messing up” my kids?

Happy Parenting recently surveyed parents about their biggest parent worry and concerns. A consistent theme when answering the question, “What keeps you awake at night regarding your kids or parenting?” was: Wondering if I am messing up my kids? Feeling like I’m a bad mother. Wondering if I am doing the best for my child? My daughter’s behavior and how I feel it reflects on me. Wondering if I should have handled things differently.   All of these questions seem to fit right in with my doctoral dissertation topic and the basis for my new book: Living in the Shadow of ...

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A child needs extra help at time of grief

A child needs extra help at time of grief

Losing someone we love is extremely painful. For children it can be especially confusing, because children do not think like adults. Studies have shown that children cannot distinguish fantasy from reality until the age of seven or eight. This makes the permanence of death difficult to grasp.  Just like the cartoon characters that pop back up after they have been run over by a car, children often think that people who are dead will come back. Helping children grieve requires awareness and emotional sensitivity from supportive adults. The grieving process involves many stages of emotions that come and go over ...

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